53 Amazing Vintage Mugshots from the Early 1870s

16 year old John Duffy, along with his brother Peter Duffy and George Lamb, were found guilty of assault and theft. He was imprisioned for 6 months.
20 year old William Badger was sentenced to 6 months incarceration for stealing a watch in 1872.
Ann Wood was sentenced to do 2 months in prison after being caught stealing money.
William Smith stole money and some scales in 1873 and was ordered to do 2 months in prison.
Mary Erskine Christie was sentenced to 6 months in prison for thieving money from a person in 1873.
Richard Bradshaw was caught stealing money and was sentenced to 6 months to serve in prison in 1872.
Robert Hardy was ordered to carry out 4 months in prison for stealing ale in 1873.
George Ray was sentenced to 4 months in prison for stealing ale in 1873.
William Brankston was convicted of the crime of theft of four rabbits and was sentenced to carry out 1 month in prison.
At the young age of 14, Henry Miller was charged with the theft of clothing and sentenced to 14 days of hard labor for his crime.
Ann Kirk was caught thieving money from people on several occasions, but this time in 1873, Ann was sentenced to 3 months in prison.
At 12, Henry Leonard Stephenson was convicted of breaking into houses and was sentenced to two months in prison.
Jane Carlisle thieved some bed linen. She served two months.
John Scott was sentenced to carry out 6 months in prison for stealing lead in 1872.
Catherine Flynn was sentenced to 6 months in prison for the conviction of the crime of stealing money from a person.
Mary Catherine Docherty was sentenced to seven days of hard labor after being convicted of stealing iron. Her three accomplices, Mary Hinnigan, Ellen Woodman, and Rosanna Watson, were given the same punishment.
Jane Carlisle thieved some bed linen and was caught and convicted of this crime. She served 2 months in prison.
John Grieveson was convicted of the crime of theft of pigeons, where he was ordered to serve 4 months in prison.
John Storey was sentenced to one month for stealing wood.
Fifteen-year-old Richard Rimmington was convicted of stealing a pipe from a shop and was expected to serve 14 days with hard labor. He was spared his sentence when his parents agreed to pay costs and the resulting fine.
Jane Cartner stole a silver watch and was sentenced to 6 months in prison.
In 1873, Ezekiel Yates was convicted of stealing tobacco and was ordered to carry out a sentence of six months.
Charles Burns was sentenced to 3 months in prison for the crime –
“false pretences”.
Alice Mullholland was sentenced to 3 months in prison after being convicted of stealing some boots.
Nineteen-year-old David Barron was a cabinetmaker who was convicted and sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for stealing champagne.
Isabella Dodds was sentenced to four months for stealing a gold watch.
Mary Patterson was sentenced to 6 weeks in 1873 for theft of poultry.
John Storey was sentenced to 1 month for stealing wood.
John Park was convicted of stealing a violin. He had no previous convictions and served one month with hard labor.
13 year old James Scullion was sentenced to 14 days hard labour for stealing clothes. After this he was sent to Reformatory School for 3 years.
John Taylor was sentenced to 1 month in prison after stealing a trowel.
After stealing a waistcoat, Ann Burns was sentenced to one month imprisonment. She was 18.
Mary Ann McCasfrey was given a prison sentence of 4 months in prison for stealing a gold watch.
Michael Clement Fisher was 13 when he and an accomplice were both charged with breaking into houses. They were sentenced to two months in prison.
Robert Charlton was imprisoned for four months for stealing two pairs of boots.
This guy, William Bell, was caught stealing some beef and sent to prison.
Edward Shevlin stole a coat and was sentenced to six months in prison.
Fifteen-year-old Margaret Cosh was convicted of stealing a coat. She had no previous convictions and served two months with hard labor.
Twelve-year-old Jane Farrell stole two boots and was sentenced to 10 hard days’ labour.
Catherine Cain King was convicted of stealing a pocket watch, she had previously served 7 days for drunken conduct, on this occasion she served 3 months with hard labour.
Seventeen-year-old Catherine Kelly was found guily of stealing bed linen and was sent to prison for three months.
John Mullen was convicted of stealing a watch and served 4 months with hard labour. This was his longest consecutive sentence having previously served time on 9 separate occasions totaling 3 months.
Isabella Smith was sentenced to six weeks for stealing poultry.
16 year old Isabella Hindmarch was convicted of stealing money, she had no previous convictions and served 1 month with hard labour.
William Brankston was convicted of the theft of four rabbits and was sentenced to carry out one month in jail.
John Bolton was convicted of stealing leather, he had previously served 9 months for theft, on this occasion he served 6 months with hard labour.
Sarah Cassidy was convicted of stealing money and served 2 months with hard labour. In the previous two years she had been convicted 6 times for breaking by laws and had already served 42 days in prison.
Elizabeth Rule (AKA Elizabeth Smith, Elizabeth Brown) was convicted of stealing clothing and bed linen 5 times between 1867 and 1872. For these convictions she served a total of 11 months 14 days.
Ann Garrett was convicted of stealing money and served 1 month with hard labour. In the previous three years she had been convicted 6 times and had served 42 days in prison.
15 year old Edward Fenn was convicted of stealing ‘wearing apparel’ on 31 March 1873 and served 1 month with hard labour.
14 year old Stephen Monaghan was convicted of stealing money on 25 July 1873 and was sentenced to 10 days hard labour and 3 years in Reformatory School.
John Thomas was convicted of stealing slippers on 23 January 1873 and was sentenced to 6 months hard labour.
Joseph Robson was convicted of stealing a bird cage on 24 February 1873 and was given a 6 month sentence.

(Photos via Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums)

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