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35 Wonderful Photos From Photo Booths Showing Men’s Hairstyles During the 1950s

The 1950s were a transformative time in American pop culture. With the creation of rock and roll, growing popularity of jazz music, and the so-called Golden Age of Television, 1950s men’s hairstyles were influenced by the likes of Elvis Presley, James Dean, Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, and Cary Grant.

The regular haircut, side-parted with tapered back and sides, was considered a clean cut fashion and preferred by parents and school authorities in the United States. The crew cut, flattop and ivy league were also popular, particularly among high school and college students.

These cool pictures that show what men’s hairstyles looked like in the 1950s.

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54 Beautiful Photos of Marianne Faithfull during the 1960s

Marianne Evelyn Gabriel Faithfull (born 29 December 1946) is an English singer, songwriter, and actress. She achieved popularity in the 1960s with the release of her hit single “As Tears Go By” and became one of the lead female artists during the British Invasion in the United States.

Born in Hampstead, London, Faithfull began her career in 1964 after attending a Rolling Stones party, where she was discovered by Andrew Loog Oldham. Her debut album Marianne Faithfull (1965) (released simultaneously with her album Come My Way) was a commercial success followed by a number of albums on Decca Records. From 1966 to 1970, she had a highly publicised romantic relationship with Mick Jagger. Her popularity was further enhanced by her film roles, such as those in I’ll Never Forget What’s’isname (1967), The Girl on a Motorcycle (1968), and Hamlet (1969). However, her popularity was overshadowed by personal problems in the 1970s. During that time she was anorexic, homeless, and a heroin addict.

Noted for her distinctive voice, Faithfull’s previously melodic and higher-registered vocals (which were prevalent throughout her career in the 1960s) were affected by severe laryngitis, coupled with persistent drug abuse during the 1970s, permanently altering her voice, leaving it raspy, cracked and lower in pitch. This new sound was praised as “whisky soaked” by some critics and seen as having helped to capture the raw emotions expressed in Faithfull’s music.

After a long commercial absence, Faithfull made a comeback with the 1979 release of her critically acclaimed album Broken English. The album was a commercial success and marked a resurgence of her musical career. Broken English earned Faithfull a nomination for the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance and is often regarded as her “definitive recording”. She followed this with a series of albums, including Dangerous Acquaintances (1981), A Child’s Adventure (1983), and Strange Weather (1987). Faithfull also wrote three books about her life: Faithfull: An Autobiography (1994), Memories, Dreams & Reflections (2007), and Marianne Faithfull: A Life on Record (2014).

Faithfull is listed on VH1’s “100 Greatest Women of Rock and Roll” list. She received the World Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2009 Women’s World Awards and was made a Commandeur of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the government of France.

Marianne Faithfull during the filming of “The Girl On A Motorcycle”, late 1967.
Marianne Faithfull and Mick Jagger in Heidelberg, Germany where Marianne was filming “The Girl On A Motorcycle” in late 1967.
Marianne Faithfull backstage at Sanremo Music Festival | January 26th-28th, 1967
Marianne Faithfull and Mick Jagger in Sanremo, Italy. January 1967
Marianne Faithfull and Mick Jagger in Sanremo, Italy. January 1967
Marianne Faithfull going to court the day after a drug raid at her and Mick Jagger’s residence at Cheyne Walk, May 1969.
Marianne Faithfull backstage in Doncaster, 1964.
Marianne Faithfull, 1965.
Marianne Faithfull, 1968.
Marianne Faithfull recording backup vocals for The Rolling Stones album “Beggars Banquet”, 1968
18-year-old Marianne Faithfull photographed for an article in “The Daily Mail” reporting about her recent engagement to art student John Dunbar, 1965.
Marianne Faithfull backstage in Belgium, June 1966.
Marianne Faithfull, 1966
Marianne Faithfull, 1966
Marianne Faithfull in rehearsal for the play “Hamlet”, 1969.
Marianne Faithfull in her flat in Lennox Gardens, London, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull performing on “Ready Steady Go”, 1965
Marianne Faithfull posing for a newspaper article announcing her engagement to Arts Undergraduate John Dunbar, 1965.
Marianne Faithfull, 1967
Marianne Faithfull at home in London, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull in San Remo, Italy, 1967
Marianne Faithfull in Amsterdam, 1966.
Marianne Faithfull on the set of “The Girl On A Motorcycle”, 1967
Marianne Faithfull in front of her childhood home on Milman Road in Reading, 1964.
Early promotional photo of Marianne Faithfull for Decca, mid-1964
Marianne Faithfull on set of “The Girl On A Motorcycle”, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull leaving Mount St. Margaret Hospital in Sydney after recovering from a week-long coma induced by an (accidental) overdose of sleeping pills, 1969.
Marianne Faithfull at home, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull, 1966
Marianne Faithfull at Churchill College, Cambridge, 1965
Marianne Faithfull, 1966.
Seventeen-year-old Marianne Faithfull posing in one of her first photoshoots in the summer of 1964
Marianne Faithfull in the 1960s
Marianne Faithfull opening fanmail backstage at San Remo Song Festival, January 1967
Marianne Faithfull near her childhood home in Reading, 1964.
Marianne Faithfull on French program “Les visiteurs d’un soir”, 1966.
Marianne Faithfull, 1964.
Marianne Faithfull, 1968
Marianne Faithfull in Heidelberg, Germany, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull, 1965
Marianne Faithfull at Heathrow Airport, late 1967
Marianne Faithfull on BBC’s music program “Gadzooks!”, June 1965
Marianne Faithfull, 1965.
Marianne Faithfull above the rooftops of London, 1965.
Marianne Faithfull on set of “The Girl On A Motorcycle”, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull on set of “The Girl On A Motorcycle”, 1967
Marianne Faithfull (and Sara), 1964.
Marianne Faithfull, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull at the San Remo Song Festival, 1967.
Marianne Faithfull, 1964
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41 Amazing Vintage Photos Showing Life of Native Americans in Western Canada during the Early 1930s

Between 1928 and 1934, the French-American anthropologist, artist, and writer Paul Coze (1903-1974) made four trips across western Canada collecting ethnographic objects for the Musée d’Ethnographie (Trocadero) in Paris and the Heye Foundation in New York.

An ardent admirer of Native American cultures, Coze helped organize the Cercle Wakanda, a group of Parisian “Indian hobbyists” who staged theatrical productions on Aboriginal themes. He also assembled a substantial private collection of ethnographic material from the Canadian Plains and Subarctic.

These photos from Provincial Archives of Alberta that he shot documenting everyday life of Native Americans in Western Canada in the early 1930s.

Cree girl playing with a child suspended in a small hammock, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree men, women and children participating in a ceremony, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree woman carrying domestic supplies, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree woman smoking beside racks of drying meat, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree women performing the round dance, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree women working on a large moose hide, Waterhen River area, Northern Saskatchewan
Cree women working on a large moose hide, Waterhen River area, Northern Saskatchewan
Dancers going to a pow-wow
Dressing a horse for a ceremony, Nakoda summer camp near Banff, Alberta
Kamaistit inside a sweat lodge, Waterhen River Cree, Northern Saskatchewan
Kousahpatsican smoking his pipe, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Kousahpatsican smoking his pipe, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Nakoda riders Rocky Mountains, Alberta
Odjindja-Tchintchan, Nakoda medicine-man, near Banff, Alberta
Paul Coze greeting Wanhinkpe, Nakoda chief, Near Banff, Alberta
Pipe ceremony at Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Preparing for a ceremony, Southern Saskatchewan
Repairing a crack in a birch bark canoe with hot resin, Waterhen River Cree, Northern Saskatchewan
Squatipew, Cree, Star Blanket Band, Fort Qu’Appelle, South Saskatchewan
Blackfoot woman with hide-scraping tools, Alberta
Blackfoot woman, Alberta
Unidentified Man and child, Nakoda summer camp near Banff, Alberta
Unidentified Plains Cree at a powwow in Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan
Unidentified Plains Cree at a powwow in Fort Qu’Appelle, Saskatchewan
Women arranging their tepees, Southern Saskatchewan
Women cooking over an open fire, Nakoda summer camp near Banff, Alberta
Women scraping a large hide, Nakoda summer camp near Banff, Alberta
Young couple beside a lake, Waterhen River Area, Northern Saskatchewan
Young couple beside a lake, Waterhen River Area, Northern Saskatchewan
Young Cree woman between two elders, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Young Cree woman with birch bark container, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Young man inside a tepee holding pipe, Southern Saskatchewan
Young men in ceremonial dresses, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Ashatcheway, a Cree medicine man, smoking an effigy pipe, Waterhen River Area, Northern Saskatchewan
Blue Bird and her sister, near Banff, Alberta
Blue Bird, Nakoda girl, near Banff, Alberta
Blue Bird, Nakoda girl, near Banff, Alberta
Ceremonial offering, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan
Ceremony being observed by visitors, Southern Saskatchewan
Chief Two Bears beside his tepee, Southern Saskatchewan
Cree and Métis men performing the pipe ceremony, Waterhen River, Northern Saskatchewan

(Photos by Paul Coze via Provincial Archives of Alberta)

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44 Amazing Vintage Photos Showing Massachussetts During the 1900s

Massachusetts was an amazing place in the early 20th century. From bustling cities to quiet rural communities and even historic landmarks, these vintage photos show just how different life in this state was in the early 1900s.

NANTASKET HOUSE, OLD HULL MASSACHUSETTS, EARLY 1900S Nantasket House, Old Hull Massachusetts, Early 1900s
Main St, Springfield, Mass. 1900
Federal Building, Springfield, Mass. 1908
Main Street, Worcester, Mass. 1906
Holyoke, Massachusetts, 1908.
The railroad arch over Main Street in Springfield, Massachusetts, 1900
Old Corner Bookstore, Washington School Streets, Boston, Mass, 1900
Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass, 1900
Tremont Street, Boston, Mass, 1906
Washington Street, Boston, Mass, 1906
The outbound platform at the Park Street station in Boston, on August 5, 1901.
Washington St, Boston, Mass, 1906
Springfield, Mass, 1908.
Springfield, Mass, 1908.
A women’s basketball team at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, 1902
Boston Elevated Railway. Sullivan Square Station. 1901.
Boston Elevated Railway. Equipment. Two car train. 1900.
U.S.S. Maryland in dry dock, Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, 1905
Playground in Tenement Alley, Boston, MA, 1909
Pin boys in Les Miserables Alleys. Lowell, Mass, 1908
Racing at the Readville racetrack in Boston, Massachusetts, 1909
Crowded Boston Street, 1900.
Boston’s Post Office Square, 1904
Central Massachusetts Railroad Relocation, viaduct from the east, Clinton, MA, 1903
Ringling Brothers circus parade, Dana, Mass, 1900
Ringling Brothers circus parade, Dana, Mass, 1900
The beginning stages of construction of the Wachusett Dam in Clinton, Mass, 1903
Boys picking over garbage on “the Dumps.” Boston, Mass, 1908.
On August 25, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt delivered a speech in Nahant, Massachusetts.
Washington Street, Boston, Mass, 1906
Six boys playing handball on street in Fall River, Massachusetts. 1900
Six boys playing handball on street in Fall River, Massachusetts. 1909
North Terminal, Boston, Massachusetts, 1905
Scollay Square Station, Boston, Mass, 1906
Commonwealth Ave., Boston,Mass, 1902
Boston, Massachusetts, 1900.
Worcester Massachusetts, 1909
Worcester Massachusetts, 1909
Merrimack Street, Lowell, Mass, 1908
Chatham Street, Worcester Mass, 1900
Poultry and Chicago Cattle hung outside the Worcester Market, Main Street, Worcester Mass. 1900
Main Street in Gloucester, Massachusetts, 1900
Tremont Street Mall, Boston, Mass, 1900
Park Street Church, Boston, Mass, 1904
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45 Vintage Photos Showing Men’s Fashion During the Early 1940s

Men’s fashion in the 1940s enjoyed what some may consider its last great hurrah in true gentlemanly style and elegance. It was an era that initially began with practical styles due to the Second World War starting in 1939 and ending in 1945. Once the war was over, the end of strict rationing was celebrated by fashion becoming more extravagant and stylish.

Men’s suits lost their vest, pocket flaps and trouser cuffs. Since the majority of men were out fighting the war, those who remained at home wanted to appear as austere as possible. All clothes became basic which led to the male wardrobe becoming much more simple and plain, with such a shortage of fabric the level of detail on men’s clothes became simple if not almost nonexistent.

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28 Incredible Vintage Photos of Marilyn Monroe in Korea in 1954

Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio were on their honeymoon in Tokyo, Japan in February of 1954 when Marilyn received an invitation from General John E. Hull’s Far East command to entertain the U.S. troops stationed in war torn Korea. After a little thought and discussion with her husband she said yes. It should be said though that Joe objected to her going to Korea at that time as he feared for her safety. The armistice had just been signed in July of 1953 and she was going to do some of her shows very close to the front lines which was still a very dangerous place at that time, but she said it was ”the least she could do.”

Her whirlwind tour consisted of ten shows in four days in sub-zero temperatures. Wearing nothing but a skin tight, low cut, plum colored sequined gown, she wowed the troops with her singing, dancing, and banter. Everywhere she went she was greeted with warmth and appreciation. One Army Corps of Engineers officer said of Marilyn, “Of all the performers who came to us in Korea-and there were a half a dozen or so-she was the best…

It was bitter cold, but she was in no hurry to leave. Marilyn was a great entertainer. She made thousands of GI’s feel like she really cared.” Marilyn performed with a band made up of eleven servicemen called Anything Goes. Her pianist, Albert Guastafeste was taken aback by how down to earth and modest she was. He was quoted as saying,”Someone ought to go up to her and tell her she is Marilyn Monroe. She doesn’t seem to realize it. When you make a goof she tells you she’s sorry. When she goofs, she apologizes to me!”

During her tour she also visited hospitals in Japan where wounded servicemen lay, stopping to talk, shaking hands, signing autographs, posing with all that asked for pictures. Even though she was totally exhausted from the tour and caught a mild case of pneumonia, she later told her friend Amy Greene that the Korea tour was one of the highlights of her entire career.

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50 Glamorous Photos of Marion Davies in the 1920s and 1930s

Marion Cecilia Davies (born Marion Cecilia Douras;[a] January 3, 1897 – September 22, 1961) was an American actress, producer, screenwriter, and philanthropist. Educated in a religious convent, Davies fled the school to pursue a career as a chorus girl. As a teenager, she appeared in several Broadway musicals and one film, Runaway Romany (1917). She soon became a featured performer in the Ziegfeld Follies. While performing in the 1916 Follies, the nineteen-year-old Marion met the fifty-three-year-old newspaper tycoon, William Randolph Hearst, and became his mistress. Hearst took over management of Davies’ career and promoted her as a motion picture actress. Hearst financed Davies’ pictures and promoted her career extensively in his newspapers and Hearst newsreels. He founded Cosmopolitan Pictures to produce her films. By 1924, Davies was the number one female box office star in Hollywood because of the popularity of When Knighthood Was in Flower and Little Old New York, which were among the biggest box-office hits of their respective years. During the zenith of the Jazz Age, Davies became renowned as the hostess of lavish soirees for Hollywood actors and political elites. However, in 1924, her name became linked with scandal when film producer Thomas Ince died at a party aboard Hearst’s yacht.

Following the decline of her film career during the Great Depression, Davies struggled with alcoholism. She retired from the screen in 1937 to devote herself to an ailing Hearst and charitable work. In Hearst’s declining years, Davies remained his steadfast companion until his death in 1951. Eleven weeks after Hearst’s death, she married sea captain Horace Brown. Their marriage lasted until Davies’ death at 64 from malignant osteomyelitis (bone cancer) of the jaw in 1961.

By the time of her death, her popular association with the character of Susan Alexander Kane in the film Citizen Kane (1941) already overshadowed Davies’ legacy as a talented actress. The title character’s second wife—an untalented singer whom he tries to promote—was widely assumed to be based upon Davies. However, many commentators, including writer-director Orson Welles, defended Davies’ record as a gifted actress and comedienne to whom Hearst’s patronage did more harm than good. In his final years, Welles attempted to correct the widespread misconceptions the film had created about Davies’ popularity and talents as an actress.

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23 Extraordinary Mugshots of Turn-of-the-Century Prisoners

“Some years ago I discovered a cache of glass negative mug shots taken in the early 20th century; each negative was inscribed with the man’s name and alleged crime. In order to research the life of each man pictured in the 500 negatives, I spent the next three years traveling back and forth from New York to the small Northern California town where the photos were taken. I discovered the photographs were taken by Clara Smith, a town photographer more accustomed to taking images of brides and babies than newly arrested suspects. The only extant records of the men’s crimes were the newspapers of the time, so I read through every copy of the daily newspaper(s) from 1901 to 1908 to find news of the men pictured in the images. The project resulted in the book, Prisoners, a collection of 70 images with accompanying narrative text on each subject.” — Arne Svenson

In Prisoners, New York artist and photographer Arne Svenson presents some two dozen portraits of turn-of-the-century prisoners, which the artist developed from found negatives. Each image (about one to two feet) is a diptych mug-shot (full face and profile), with the criminal’s name and crime etched into the emulsion and visible above the subject’s head. The crimes range from petty larceny to murder in various ages and races.

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31 Amazing Vintage Photos of Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable On the Set of “The Misfits”, 1960

The Misfits is a 1961 American drama film written by Arthur Miller, directed by John Huston, and starring Clark Gable, Marilyn Monroe and Montgomery Clift. The supporting cast features Thelma Ritter, Eli Wallach and Kevin McCarthy. It marked the last completed film of both Gable and Monroe. For Gable, the film was posthumously released, while Monroe died the following year.

The plot centers on a recently divorced woman (Monroe) and her time spent with a cowboy (Gable), his tow truck-driving friend (Wallach) and his rodeo-riding friend (Clift) in the Western Nevada desert in the 1960s. The film was a commercial failure at the time of its release, but received positive critical comments for its script and performances, and is highly regarded today.

Here below are lovely photos that captured behind the scenes of Marilyn Monroe and Clark Gable while filming “The Misfits” in 1960.

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62 Stunning Photographs of Actress Marlene Dietrich From the 1930s to the 1950s

Marie Magdelene Dietrich was born in Berlin, Germany on December 27, 1901. Her father was an army officer who had served in the Franco-Prussian War. Because of his constant absences from the family due to his army duties, Marlene and the rest had to rely on themselves. When he died, while she was 11, Marlene’s mother married Eduard von Losch. Marlene enjoyed music and attended concerts. She was adept at playing the violin and piano. By the time she was in her mid-teens, Marlene had discovered the stage. Acting was to be her vocation. In 1921, Marlene applied for an acting school run by Max Reinhardt. She was accepted. She appeared in several stage production, but never had more than a couple of spoken lines. In short, she wasn’t setting the stage world on fire. She attempted films for the first time in 1922 Her first film was The Little Napoleon (1923) which was followed by Love Tragedy (1923). On this last project, she met Rudolf Sieber and married him in 1924. The union lasted until his death in 1976 although they didn’t live together that whole time. The remainder of her early film career was generally filled with bit roles that never amounted to a whole lot. After being seen in the German production of The Blue Angel (1930) in 1930, Marlene was given a crack at Hollywood. Her first US film was Morocco (1930) with Gary Cooper later that year followed, by Dishonored (1931) in 1931. This latter movie had her cast as a street walker who is appointed a spy. The film was a rather boring affair but was a success because of Marlene’s presence. Movie goers were simply attracted to her. In 1932, Marlene filmed Shanghai Express (1932) which proved to be immensely popular raking in $3 million. Once again, she was cast as a prostitute. The next film was Blonde Venus (1932) which turned out to be a horrible production. Her co-star was Cary Grant and once again she was cast as a prostitute. Marlene seemed to be typecast as a woman of low morals and she wanted different parts. Some films such as Desire (1936) in 1936 didn’t do that but she wanted to expand. Her chance came in 1939 in Destry Rides Again (1939) when she was cast as “Frenchy”, a Western saloon hostess. This began a new direction for Marlene since it shed the typecasting which she was forced to endure during her career. All through the 1940s, she appeared in well-produced, well-directed films such as Manpower (1942), The Spoilers (1942), The Lady Is Willing (1942) and Pittsburgh (1942) all in 1942. Afterwards the roles came fewer, perhaps one to two films every year. In 1945, Marlene didn’t appear in any. She only made seven productions in the 1950’s. Her last role of any substance was Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) in 1961. Despite the lack of theatrical roles, Marlene still made appearances on the stage. However, by 1979, she was a shell of her former self. After breaking her leg in one performance, she never made a go of it in show business again. Spending the last 12 years of her life bed-ridden, Marlene died on May 6, 1992 in Paris, France of natural causes at the age of 90.
(Text bt Denny Jackson via IMDB.com)

Marlene Dietrich in No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Marlene Dietrich in No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Marlene Dietrich in No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Marlene Dietrich in No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Marlene Dietrich in No Highway in the Sky (1951)
Marlene Dietrich in Morocco (1930)
Marlene Dietrich and James Stewart in Destry Rides Again (1939)
Marlene Dietrich in Desire (1936)
Marlene Dietrich in Desire (1936)
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich in Angel (1937)
Marlene Dietrich in Angel (1937)
Marlene Dietrich in Angel (1937)
Marlene Dietrich in Der blaue Engel (1930)
Marlene Dietrich in Rancho Notorious (1952)
Marlene Dietrich in Rancho Notorious (1952)
Marlene Dietrich, 1933
Marlene Dietrich in “The Devil is a Woman,” 1935
Marlene Dietrich, 1930.
Marlene Dietrich, in “Morocco,” 1930
Marlene Dietrich, in Shanghai Express, 1932.
Marlene Dietrich, 1955
Marlene Dietrich, 1955
Marlene Dietrich, 1955
Marlene Dietrich, 1955
Marlene Dietrich, 1950.
Marlene Dietrich, 1930
Marlene Dietrich, in Shanghai Express, 1932.
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich 1940
Marlene Dietrich, 1936
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich, in Shanghai Express, 1932.
Marlene Dietrich 1948
On the SS Europa, 1933.
Marlene Dietrich, in “Morocco,” 1930
Marlene Dietrich, In Seven Sinners, 1940.
Marlene Dietrich, in Blue Angel, close-up, 1930.
Marlene Dietrich, in Seven Sinners, 1940.
Marlene Dietrich by Milton Greene, 1952.
Posing with her Jeep, 1944.
As Shanghai Lily, in Shanghai Express, 1932.
Marlene Dietrich by George Hurrell, 1937.
Marlene Dietrich, in Song of Songs, 1933
Marlene Dietrich 1934
Marlene Dietrich, 1947.
Marlene Dietrich, 1945.
Marlene Dietrich, 1942
Marlene Dietrich, in “The Spoilers”, 1942
Marlene Dietrich, in Seven Sinners, 1940.
Marlene Dietrich, in Seven Sinners, 1940.
Marlene Dietrich, in Seven Sinners, 1940.
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich
Marlene Dietrich, in Angel, 1937
Marlene Dietrich, in Angel, 1937
Marlene Dietrich, in Angel, 1937
Marlene Dietrich, in Angel, 1937
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35 Vintage Photos of Moscow during the 1930s

Eirik Sundvor (1902 – 1992) was a Norwegian journalist of Avisa Nidaros from 1924 to 1940, and 1945 to 1957. Sundvor fled to England where he was the editor of the Norwegian Tidend in London with his wife during the war. He was responsible for the release of the first free Norwegian newspaper in Finnmark in 1945.

After Avisa Nidaros entered as a daily newspaper, Sundvor moved back to Bergen, where he originally came from. Here he worked as a correspondent for Dagbladet in Western Norway.

These amazing photos are from a trip to the Soviet Union made by Eirik Sundvor. They document everyday life of Moscow in 1935.

(Photos by Eirik Sundvor)