Wonderful Vintage Photos of Woodstock, Vermont in the Early 1940.

Woodstock is the shire town (county seat) of Windsor County, Vermont, United States. As of the 2020 census, the town population was 3,005. It includes the villages of Woodstock, South Woodstock, Taftsville, and West Woodstock.

Chartered by New Hampshire Governor Benning Wentworth on July 10, 1761, the town was a New Hampshire grant to David Page and 61 others. It was named after Woodstock in Oxfordshire, England, as a homage to both Blenheim Palace and its owner, George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough. The town was first settled in 1768 by James Sanderson and his family. In 1776, Joab Hoisington built a gristmill, followed by a sawmill, on the south branch of the Ottauquechee River. The town was incorporated in 1837.

Although the Revolution slowed settlement, Woodstock developed rapidly once the war ended in 1783. The Vermont General Assembly met here in 1807 before moving the next year to the new capital at Montpelier. Waterfalls in the Ottauquechee River provided water power to operate mills. Factories made scythes and axes, carding machines, and woolens. There was a machine shop and gunsmith shop. Manufacturers also produced furniture, wooden wares, window sashes and blinds. Carriages, horse harnesses, saddles, luggage trunks and leather goods were also manufactured. By 1859, the population was 3,041. The Woodstock Railroad opened to White River Junction on September 29, 1875, carrying freight and tourists. The Woodstock Inn opened in 1892.

The Industrial Revolution helped the town grow prosperous. The economy is now largely driven by tourism. Woodstock has the 20th highest per-capita income of Vermont towns as reported by the United States Census, and a high percentage of homes owned by non-residents. The town’s central square, called the Green, is bordered by restored late Georgian, Federal Style, and Greek Revival houses. The cost of real estate in the district adjoining the Green is among the highest in the state. The seasonal presence of wealthy second-home owners from cities such as Boston and New York has contributed to the town’s economic vitality and livelihood, while at the same time diminished its accessibility to native Vermonters.

The town maintains a free (paid for through taxation) community wi-fi internet service that covers most of the village of Woodstock, dubbed “Wireless Woodstock”. (Wikipedia)

Farmers playing cards on a winter morning, Woodstock, Vermont, 1939
The ski town of Woodstock, Vermont is generally very crowded with skiers on weekends, 1939
The ski town of Woodstock, Vermont is generally very crowded with skiers on weekends, 1939
Farmer’s Co-op truck full of milk cans driving into town, March 1940
Farmers near Woodstock, Vermont bring their cans of milk to the crossroads early every morning where it is picked up by the coop farmers’ truck and is taken to the city, March 1940
Hired man on a farm near Woodstock, Vermont, usually empties the radiator in his car every evening and refills it again with water in the morning to save the cost of antifreeze, 1940
Horse and sled of a garbage and rubbish collector Woodstock, Vermont, 1940
Mailman making deliveries after a heavy snowfall, Woodstock, Vermont, 1940..
Mailman making deliveries after a heavy snowfall, Woodstock, Vermont, 1940..
Mailman making deliveries after a heavy snowfall, Woodstock, Vermont, 1940..
Snowy night in the Center of town in Woodstock, Vermont, February 1940
Townspeople discussing the severe winter on the street corner in center of town in Woodstock, Vermont, March 1940
Townspeople of Woodstock, Vermont discussing the severe winter on the street corner in center of town, March 1940
Townspeople of Woodstock, Vermont discussing the severe winter on the street corner in center of town, March 1940
Two men on a street in Woodstock, Vermont, March 1940

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